THE JOURNEY

Research Areas

The lonliest tree in the world
Shelley McMurtrie
6 Jan 2014 - 17:07
Research Areas
50 Degrees South Trust, Spruce tree on Campbell Island

An unruly, wind-blown, 100-year-old spruce tree on subantarctic Campbell Island is possibly the world's loneliest tree. Veronika Meduna visited it earlier in December 2013 with Jonathan Palmer, who analysed its tree rings to study the...

NORM'S BLOG 5 : Wreck relics in Monument Harbour
Norm Judd
23 Jun 2012 - 11:30
Research Areas
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: Monument Harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: The Maia in Monument Harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: Six Foot Lake descent from Puiseux Peak
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition: timber beam, monument harbour
WHAT THE CAMPBELL ISLAND BICENTENNIAL EXPEDITION (CIBE) FOUND IN 2011

In December 2010, and January and February 2011, the Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition, (CIBE) was on Campbell Island.  The cultural heritage team; archaeologists Steve Bagley and Nigel...

What the camera saw - Camp Cove
Norm Judd
12 Nov 2011 - 18:00
Research Areas
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition-lady of the heather ghost story
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition-lady of the heather ghost story
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition-lady of the heather ghost story
While we await the cultural heritage team’s report, I’ll entertain you with a yarn. 
 
I thought that this could be a ghost story: but that’s a populist approach and I don’t believe in ghosts.  There’s either a technical reason for what I’m about to tell you or the phenomenon was just simple coincidence.
 
When I first went to Campbell Island, my Dept. of Lands and Survey brief...
Interview anyone? Seeking research participants
Carla Meurk
14 Feb 2011 - 19:29
Research Areas
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition
Campbell Island Bicentennial Expedition

Now that the team are back on the mainland it is time to consolidate our island research into publications. With respect to two of my projects data collection from Campbell constitutes one component of a wider research agenda requiring further empirical research. The first of these two projects focuses on the history and anthropology of scientific endeavour on Campbell and the influence of changing bureaucracies of science funding and management; the second will utilise a network analysis...

Farewell windsocks of science
Alex Fergus
7 Feb 2011 - 20:11
Research Areas
Clearing the nets
Cutting down nets
Folding the nets
Mountford 2008 Chardonnay
Mountford 2008 Chardonnay

60 days of snow, rain, hail and gale has pelted the six 3 metre long insect nets that I installed with Steve C., Carla and Jo’s help just south of the base after our arrival. Against the demons of weather, the nets have stood strong, no doubt due to the clever hand of the net constructor, my Ma, and her sewing machine.

For 2 months I have daily cleared the amassed invertebrate treasure, often with Carla’s assistance, and with Carla and Mark covering for me when I have...

Vegetation regrowth
Norm Judd
2 Feb 2011 - 20:32
Research Areas
The Bivvy - 1981
The Bivvy - 2011

Many of the historic sites that were easily seen in 1981 are now obscured by scrub and other vegetation. I have included two images here that show the rate of vegetative growth on Campbell Island over the last 30 years.

The first image is one I took on my 1981 visit to the island. It shows posts and a central pole of what may have been a small tent camp from the early farming era beginning 1895 – a site now known as the ‘Bivvy’. In the middle distance are two...

WHALE OIL – SEAL OIL?
Norm Judd
26 Jan 2011 - 21:53
Research Areas
Peat brick layer
Peat brick profile
Try works site

Yesterday the History Team of Steve, Nigel and Norm walked to a site believed to have once held a try pot or try pots for rendering seal or whale blubber. It’s not too far from Beeman Camp where we are staying and we are thankful for this as we still have lots of walking to do to finish our research projects by 4 February. (In addition, the average age for our team is 64.3 making ours the oldest team by far. We three agree our knees have seen better days and have talked about getting...

The ultimate ascent of the world’s loneliest tree
Alex Fergus
25 Jan 2011 - 20:35
Research Areas
The loneliest tree
An official beginning
My support team
The inner workings
Manoeuvring
Near the top
Top of main trunk
The tree top
The tree top
I was pretty chuffed
Whittaker’s celebration
I earned it
Trigonometric measure

I am the last person to ever ascend the loneliest tree in the world. I did this earlier today, and I am on a bit of a high as a result. I have joined a legion of eminent New Zealand naturalists, among them Sorensen (1945), Godley (1969) and Meurk (1975+) who have measured the height of the Sitka Spruce (Picea sitchensis) at Camp Cove. Lord Ranfurly planted the tree in 1907 and from the 1940’s onward it has been repeatedly measured, in part for posterity, in part because it is an...

OPEN BOAT WHALING IN THE SOUTHERN OCEAN
Norm Judd
24 Jan 2011 - 21:42
Research Areas
Timber pieces
Bottle

On 21 January, the History Team (Steve, Nigel and Norm) walked over to the North West Bay hut. This was our base for visiting nearby sites. In cold and blustery north easterlies the following day, we carefully traversed Sandy Bay avoiding ‘beach master’ sea lions (otherwise known in Met. Station terms as ‘monsters’) and then climbed 35 metres onto Complex Point. Pushing through tussock, ‘draco’ and fern, we arrived at the knoll at the end of the point....

Fred’s Cave Continued
Norm Judd
24 Jan 2011 - 21:27
Research Areas
Cave below bluffs
Cave entrance
Bowl contents
Contents closeup
View from cave

I left you in my last blog crawling through the draco in search of Fred Blogg’s Cave above North East Harbour.

We sidled below the long line of bluffs and the cave soon appeared above us; a dark, overhanging cavern offering shelter from rain and wind and the floor was dry. On Campbell Island this is a boon.

In the centre of the cave floor sat a large alloy bowl, its alloy lid anchored by a large rock. After photographs and measurements we carefully removed the rock...

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